Posted by: Cactus Yak | August 4, 2008

Ladyfish = Skipjack

On a recent fishing trip to Dewberry Bay, Kris hooked and landed a ladyfish. He joked that it was a baby tarpon as he was reeling it in. As I was too busy fishing to watch him land it, I later asked him if indeed it was a baby tarpon  He said “No. It was a ladyfish.” I replied… “Oh, a skipjack.” He then proceeded to tell me they were not one in the same. I didn’t agree having learned my fish identification from a trusted fishing guide, so I did some research.

The Florida Museum of Natural History has one of the best overviews on the species. Although the common name is “ladyfish”. Other names include “skipjack”.

As I was researching it, I started to understand Kris’ confusion on the topic. NOAA maintains a list of Atlantic and Gulf Coast fish names. There are actually 3 species of fish that are commonly called “skipjacks”. They are:

  1. Bluefish – POMATOMUS SALTATRIX
  2. Ladyfish – ELOPS SAURUS
  3. Skipjack Tuna – KATSUWONUS PELAMIS

Regardless of what you call it they are a lot of fun to catch. As Kris’ hinted while he was landing it, they are related to the tarpon. They dance on the water and put up one helluva fight.

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Responses

  1. Skipjack tuna is what I was refering to, much thicker (rounder). BTW – they are a fun fight for kids (so you’d love them, but if I catch trash, I prefer those 28″ gafftops that circle the yak when I almost have them in, then take off with the line trying to flip me out of the yak.


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